Archive for the ‘Sleeping Disorders’ Category

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Saturday, February 16th, 2008

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Cancer Kills 7.6 Million Worldwide, But U.S. Rate Down

Tuesday, December 18th, 2007

Alcohol, rich food, and increased levels of stress and excitement are a recipe for a potentially fatal holiday heart attack, according to researchers who studied spikes in coronary death rates around Christmas and New Year’s.

The Los Angeles Times reported Dec. 17 that researchers have studied the phenomena of the “Merry Christmas Coronary” and the “Happy New Year Heart Attack”: Dec. 25 and Jan. 1 are the two deadliest days of the year for heart attacks, and the heart-disease death rate is 33 percent higher in December and January than the rest of the year.

Researchers found that the increase was not related to cold weather or shoveling snow, noting that death rates rose even in sunny southern California. Robert A. Kloner, a cardiologist at Good Samaritan Hospital in Los Angeles, said that revelers should avoid excessive alcohol, food, and salt to prevent a holiday tragedy. “Avoid excess physical exertion, overeating, lack of sleep, emotional stress and anger,” he said. “They have all been associated with cardiac events.”

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Avoid Alcohol to Prevent Holiday Heart Attacks

Tuesday, December 18th, 2007

Alcohol, rich food, and increased levels of stress and excitement are a recipe for a potentially fatal holiday heart attack, according to researchers who studied spikes in coronary death rates around Christmas and New Year’s.

The Los Angeles Times reported Dec. 17 that researchers have studied the phenomena of the “Merry Christmas Coronary” and the “Happy New Year Heart Attack”: Dec. 25 and Jan. 1 are the two deadliest days of the year for heart attacks, and the heart-disease death rate is 33 percent higher in December and January than the rest of the year.

Researchers found that the increase was not related to cold weather or shoveling snow, noting that death rates rose even in sunny southern California. Robert A. Kloner, a cardiologist at Good Samaritan Hospital in Los Angeles, said that revelers should avoid excessive alcohol, food, and salt to prevent a holiday tragedy. “Avoid excess physical exertion, overeating, lack of sleep, emotional stress and anger,” he said. “They have all been associated with cardiac events.”

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Regular Opioid Users Can Drive Safely, Study Suggests

Wednesday, December 12th, 2007

People who take opioid-based drugs to treat chronic pain can drive about as well as others on the road, according to researchers from Rush University in Chicago.

The New York Times reported Dec. 4 that researchers used a driving simulator to compare the reaction times, weaving and accident rates of subjects taking oral morphine for pain to a control group that was not taking pain medication.

Lead researcher Asokumar Buvanendran said that, unlike occasional users, long-term pain patients develop tolerance to opiates that tends to limit their intoxicating effects. “If I suddenly took 30 milligrams of morphine, I’d probably sleep for 10 hours, whereas someone who took it for the last two years is probably as alert as I am now,” he said.

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NIAAA Says Gene Affects Alcohol Consumption

Wednesday, December 12th, 2007

People who take opioid-based drugs to treat chronic pain can drive about as well as others on the road, according to researchers from Rush University in Chicago.

The New York Times reported Dec. 4 that researchers used a driving simulator to compare the reaction times, weaving and accident rates of subjects taking oral morphine for pain to a control group that was not taking pain medication.

Lead researcher Asokumar Buvanendran said that, unlike occasional users, long-term pain patients develop tolerance to opiates that tends to limit their intoxicating effects. “If I suddenly took 30 milligrams of morphine, I’d probably sleep for 10 hours, whereas someone who took it for the last two years is probably as alert as I am now,” he said.

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Opioid Users Can Drive Safely, Study Says

Tuesday, December 11th, 2007

People who take opioid-based drugs to treat chronic pain can drive about as well as others on the road, according to researchers from Rush University in Chicago.

The New York Times reported Dec. 4 that researchers used a driving simulator to compare the reaction times, weaving and accident rates of subjects taking oral morphine for pain to a control group that was not taking pain medication.

Lead researcher Asokumar Buvanendran said that, unlike occasional users, long-term pain patients develop tolerance to opiates that tends to limit their intoxicating effects. “If I suddenly took 30 milligrams of morphine, I’d probably sleep for 10 hours, whereas someone who took it for the last two years is probably as alert as I am now,” he said.

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Amygdala is Link Between Addiction, Mental Illness, Researchers Say

Tuesday, December 11th, 2007

People who take opioid-based drugs to treat chronic pain can drive about as well as others on the road, according to researchers from Rush University in Chicago.

The New York Times reported Dec. 4 that researchers used a driving simulator to compare the reaction times, weaving and accident rates of subjects taking oral morphine for pain to a control group that was not taking pain medication.

Lead researcher Asokumar Buvanendran said that, unlike occasional users, long-term pain patients develop tolerance to opiates that tends to limit their intoxicating effects. “If I suddenly took 30 milligrams of morphine, I’d probably sleep for 10 hours, whereas someone who took it for the last two years is probably as alert as I am now,” he said.

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Marijuana Not a Drug, Schwarzenegger Says

Tuesday, October 30th, 2007

 Marijuana is “not a drug, it’s a leaf,” according to California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, who made the comment during an interview with the U.K. edition of the magazine GQ.

The Associated Press reported Oct. 28 that Schwarzenegger, who has acknowledged smoking marijuana during the 1970s, adding that his “drug of choice” at the time was “pumping iron.”

A spokesperson for the governor, Aaron McLear, later said that Schwarzenwegger was joking. “The governor was doing an interview with the host of ‘America’s Got Talent,’ the newest version of the gong show,” he said. “Of course the governor understands marijuana is a drug. It’s like when he goes on Leno or the Daily Show, if you took something like that out of context, it might seem shocking but it was in a silly entertainment context.”

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Cephalon Added Warning To Provigil Label About Serious Skin Reactions In August 2007

Wednesday, October 24th, 2007

A “Dear Doctor” Letter About Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis Associated With Provigil Was Sent In September 2007

(Posted by Tom Lamb at DrugInjuryWatch.com)

On October 24, 2007 the FDA sent an email alert to inform doctors and other Men’s healthcare providers that the drug company Cephalon issued a revised package insert, or label, for Provigil (modafinil) in August 2007.

According to this October 2007 FDA alert about Provigil:

Provigil is indicated to improve wakefulness in adult patients with excessive sleepiness associated with narcolepsy, obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome, and shift work sleep disorder….

Sleep Disorder Narcolepsy Drug Provigil Associated With Serious Skin Reactions

Thursday, September 20th, 2007

FDA Links Cephalon’s Provigil To Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis, Stevens-Johnson Syndrome, And Erythema Multiforme

(Posted by Tom Lamb at DrugInjuryWatch.com)

According to the Fall 2007 FDA Drug Safety Newsletter (Volume 1, Number 1), which was released in mid-September 2007, the FDA has been monitoring cases of serious skin reactions associated with the sleep disorder drug Provigil (modafinil). This medication, made by the drug company Cephalon, Inc., is prescribed to treat patients with excessive sleepiness (ES) associated with narcolepsy, obstructive sleep apnea / hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS), and shift work sleep disorder.

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