Archive for the ‘Online Prescription’ Category

CALPIRG Statement on Assembly Passage of ABX1-1

Tuesday, December 18th, 2007

Statement by Mike Russo, Men’s health Care Advocate and Staff Attorney for CALPIRG:

Experts See Growing Illegal Market for Buprenorphine

Monday, December 17th, 2007

Buprenorphine (Suboxone) was developed as an alternative to methadone that would be equally effective in treating opiate addiction but less likely to be abused. But Baltimore officials say that a black market for the drug has developed, leading to “bupe” abuse and some deaths, the Baltimore Sun reported Dec. 16.

Unlike methadone, buprenorphine can be prescribed by individual doctors or group practices, not just distributed at treatment clinics. The drug’s formula is designed to minimize its abuse potential — it contains naloxone, which makes users sick if they ingest it — but some users are crushing the pills and snorting or injecting the drug to get high, either filtering out the naloxone or putting up with its ill effects.

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Smoking, Illicit Drug Use Declines Among 8th-Graders, NIDA Reports

Tuesday, December 11th, 2007

The annual Monitoring the Future survey finds declining use of cigarettes and illicit drugs among 8th-graders that signifies “an ongoing cultural shift among teens and their attitudes about smoking and substance abuse,” according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA).

NIDA said that the 2007 survey found considerable declines in lifetime, past-month, and daily smoking among 8th-graders. Daily smoking rates fell to 3 percent, down from a peak of 10.4 percent in 1996.

A similar percentage of 8th-graders reported past-year marijuana use, down from 18.3 percent in 1996. However, the report found no declines in annual marijuana use among 10th- and 12th-graders.

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December 2007 FDA “Patient Safety News” Videos For Doctors Online

Monday, December 10th, 2007

Covers Sprint Fidelis Cardiac Leads, Byetta, And Bisphosphonates Such As Fosamax

(Posted by Tom Lamb at DrugInjuryWatch.com)

The FDA’s Patient Safety News (PSN) is a series of monthly video news shows intended primarily for doctors and other Men’s health care professionals.

Methadone OD Deaths Up 390 Percent, Report Finds

Friday, December 7th, 2007

Deaths from overdoses on methadone rose 390 percent between 1999 and 2004, and the trend is continuing, according to a new report from the National Drug Intelligence Center.

USA Today reported Dec. 6 that the report attributes the trend mostly to increased use of methadone as a painkiller; the drug is seen as a cheaper alternative to drugs like OxyContin, which also have more potential for abuse and diversion. Doctors prescribed 715 percent more methadone in 2006 than they had in 2001.

The methadone overdose rate was highest among those ages 15 to 24; the rate was lower than that for other narcotic painkillers but is rising faster.

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November 2007 FDA Advisory Panel Recommends That Serevent And Advair Get Stronger Warnings About Use By Children

Thursday, November 29th, 2007

Some Panel Members Want Serevent Withdrawn From Market; FDA And GSK Say Asthma Drug Recall Is Not Appropriate

(Posted by Tom Lamb at DrugInjuryWatch.com)

On November 28, 2007 an FDA pediatric advisory panel recommended that the safety warnings on Serevent and Advair needed to be strengthened in order to emphasize the increased risk of hospitalization and death for children using these two asthma drugs from GlaxoSmithKline PLC (GSK).

For some information about the extent of use by children, we get this sales information about

Study Links College Football Games to Heavy Drinking

Wednesday, November 28th, 2007

NASCAR driver Aaron Fike reached an agreement with a Warren County (Ohio) judge to deliver anti-drug messages to youths in exchange for avoiding jail time in his arrest for heroin possession last summer, Associated Press Sports reported Nov. 27.

NASCAR driver Aaron Fike and his fiancee Cassandra Davidson was arrested in an amusement park parking lot in Cincinnati. After four months of rehabilitation, Fike presented a proposal to the judge to avoid jail time by going to schools and racetracks to deliver an anti-drug message.

“One day, I was a NASCAR race car driver, with people asking me for my autograph, and the next day I was in handcuffs, lying on the floor of a jail cell, going through the absolute agony of heroin withdrawal,” Fike wrote in the proposal the judge accepted Nov. 6.

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NASCAR Driver Avoids Jail by Delivering Anti-Drug Message

Wednesday, November 28th, 2007

NASCAR driver Aaron Fike reached an agreement with a Warren County (Ohio) judge to deliver anti-drug messages to youths in exchange for avoiding jail time in his arrest for heroin possession last summer, Associated Press Sports reported Nov. 27.

NASCAR driver Aaron Fike and his fiancee Cassandra Davidson was arrested in an amusement park parking lot in Cincinnati. After four months of rehabilitation, Fike presented a proposal to the judge to avoid jail time by going to schools and racetracks to deliver an anti-drug message.

“One day, I was a NASCAR race car driver, with people asking me for my autograph, and the next day I was in handcuffs, lying on the floor of a jail cell, going through the absolute agony of heroin withdrawal,” Fike wrote in the proposal the judge accepted Nov. 6.

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FDA Announces In November 2007 That It Will Investigate Possible Link Between Maxipime And Increased Risk Of Death

Tuesday, November 20th, 2007

A Medical Journal Article Published In May 2007 Suggested This Emerging Drug Safety Issue; Why Was There A Six-Month Delay In Starting This FDA Investigation?

In mid-November 2007 the FDA sent an MedWatch Email Alert to inform the public about an emerging drug safety issue involving Maxipime (Cefepime), an injectable antibiotic that was approved by the FDA in 1996.

State Medicaid Programs Hinder Naltrexone Use

Tuesday, November 20th, 2007

States that allow managed-care programs to limit prescriptions and access to pharmacy networks are hindering the use of naltrexone for treating alcohol addiction, according to research from the Substance Abuse Policy Research Program (SAPRP).

Researchers Carolyn Heinrich of the University of Wisconsin at Madison and Carolyn Hill of Georgetown University found that treatment providers were more likely to prescribe naltrexone in states where use of generic drugs is encouraged in Medicaid programs. In states where managed-care firms dictate prescription rules, however, naltrexone was less likely to be prescribed. Other barriers to naltrexone use were restricting use of Medicaid funds for addiction treatment and the use of restrictive preferred-drug lists for Medicaid patients.

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