Archive for the ‘Medical News’ Category

DIY abortions at home

Friday, December 21st, 2007


Women can safely have DIY abortions at home, a study has concluded. The pilot study, set up by the Department of Health (DoH), found that women less than nine weeks pregnant could safely have the medical abortion outside of hospital.

None of the 172 women, who were given tablets to terminate their pregnancy supervised by a nurse in a health centre, suffered serious complications. Shirley Butler, who managed the pilot project, said: “This has been a successful pilot and it has proved that abortion is safe outside a hospital. “We have had few problems. Some women experienced pain and they were given painkillers. “One woman had haemorrhaging, but if she had been at home she would have called our helpline and she would have been given help.”
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What Is The Best Medicine For Arthritis

Thursday, December 20th, 2007

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Photos Real Estate Virtual Malls Society/Culture Sports Telephone Television Toys As rheumatoid arthritis progresses, these abnormal synovial cells begin to invade and destroy the

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Photos More New Test Criteria Spots Rheumatoid Arthritis Sooner SUNDAY, Nov. 11 ( (more…)

New Statin Free Drug is Effective at Cutting Heart Attack Risk

Thursday, December 20th, 2007

(Ivanhoe Newswire) – A new and different kind of cholesterol-lowering drug is proving safe and effective at reducing the risk of heart disease.

In its first clinical trial, the new drug, known only as KB2115, has been shown to cut low density lipoprotein ‘bad’ cholesterol (LDL) by 40%. The best drug trial using cholesterol cutting statins show that they reduce the incidence of new heart attacks by only 35%.

KB2115 mimics the action of thyroid hormone and safely speeds up the hormone’s natural ability to get rid of LDL out of the body. Until now, efforts to attack cholesterol using drugs that mimic thyroid hormone have been unsuccessful because in addition to the (more…)

Monkeys Perform Arithmetic As Well As College Students

Thursday, December 20th, 2007

(Ivanhoe Newswire) – When it comes to nonverbal arithmetic, a new study shows that monkeys can hold their own against college students.

A study appearing in the open-access Public Library of Science (PLoS) Biology, researchers Elizabeth Brannon and Jessica Cantlon set out to discover if humans and nonhuman animals share a capacity for nonverbal arithmetic. They had monkeys and college students add the numerical value of two sets of dots and choose a stimulus from two options that reflected the answer. They found that monkeys perform approximate mental addition in a way that is remarkable similar to the way the college students perform the exercise.

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Question Raised About False-positive Cardiac Cathetorization

Thursday, December 20th, 2007

(Ivanhoe Newswire) –Restoring blood flow (reperfusion) in heart attack victims with a blocked artery is a race against time. To get reperfusion quickly current emergency guidelines recommend that when someone is suspected of having a blocked artery heart attack (STEMI), emergency doctors immediately activate a cardiac catheterization laboratory and get the patient an angioplasty or a stent as soon as possible. The immediate activation is necessary so that laboratory personal can be in place before the doctor makes the decision about the need for a procedure rather than waiting until they see the results to call the catheterization team in.

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New Docs Need Drug Company Training

Thursday, December 20th, 2007

(Ivanhoe Newswire) – If you watch TV, you probably thinking pharmaceutical companies are spending their last dollar to get you to try their drugs.

In reality, however, the bulk of the pharmaceutical industry’s advertising budget goes to convince doctors of the merits of their medications. A new study conducted by investigators from the Indiana School of Medicine and the Regenstrief Institute, Inc., looked at how pharmaceutical company contact early in a doctor’s training might impact his or her attitudes about these companies.

The researchers reviewed 12 studies conducted over the past 16 years, finding medical schools made the most impact on doctor-company relationships when they simply refused to allow companies any contact with students. These students ended up being more skeptical about information received from drug companies when they became full-fledged doctors.

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Good News, Bad News about Heart Disease

Thursday, December 20th, 2007

(Ivanhoe Newswire) – Researchers have good news and bad news about heart disease in the U.S.

The good news is, fewer people are dying of heart disease overall. The death rate from coronary artery disease in men fell by 52 percent between 1980 and 2002. In women, it dropped by 49 percent.

The bad news is, most of the benefit is being seen in older people. When researchers looked just at people age 35 to 54, the findings were anything but reassuring. While death rates did go down over the 22 year period, the rate of decline slowed markedly in younger people. In men, the drop ranged from 6.2 percent per year in the 1980s to just 0.5 percent per year between 2000 and 2002.

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Robotic Surgery for Cancer Involving Tonsils Shows Promise

Wednesday, December 19th, 2007

(Ivanhoe Newswire) — A surgical technique using robotic arms is offering hope to cancer patients who need radical tonsillectomies. The new procedure is called transoral robotic surgery (TORS) and, after evaluation over a 2-year period at the University of Pennsylvania, it appears to be a significant improvement over the current procedure.

Right now, surgeons have limited access to the tonsils. And if the cancer has spread to surrounding tissue, the procedure involves cutting through skin. It can be a lengthy surgery often followed by long-term difficulty in swallowing. It usually requires the placement of a tracheotomy tube.

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Indoor Tanning Patterns Help Doctor’s Target Prevention

Wednesday, December 19th, 2007

(Ivanhoe Newswire) — Evidence that indoor tanning poses a serious skin cancer risk is rising. A new study helps doctors identify who’s doing the tanning and why so they can better target prevention messages. The study revealed that when it comes to indoor tanning, one size does not fit all.

Joel Hillhouse, Ph.D., at the East Tennessee State University, Johnson City and his colleagues studied the indoor tanning behaviors of 168 young women between January 2006 and April 2006. The average age of the participants was 20 and they all attended a southeastern university. They were all asked to fill out questionnaires to determine behavioral patterns, intentions, attitudes and perceptions abut indoor tanning. It also measured indoor tanning norms, perceived subjective norms and indoor tanning dependence and predictors.

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Help for Crohn’s Sufferers

Wednesday, December 19th, 2007

Help for Crohn's Sufferers

Help for Crohn's Sufferers

Help for Crohn's Sufferers

Help for Crohn's Sufferers (more…)