Archive for the ‘Diet’ Category

Hair Helps Police Track Criminals

Monday, March 3rd, 2008

(Ivanhoe Newswire) — Water is not only good for your body — it’s good for the police! The general location a person drank water is recorded in their hair, showing where they have been in recent weeks and years. This could help police track the past movements of criminal suspects or unidentified murder victims.

“You are what you eat and drink — and that is recorded in your hair,” co-author Thure Cerling, University of Utah, was quoted as saying.

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Health Alternative Massage Therapy And Bodywork

Saturday, February 16th, 2008

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with detailed information on alternative and natural medicine remedies, health conditions, complimentary and preventive health care up in this thriving new field of Health Care

Clearheart Bodywork training, alternative medicine program, Comox
Unique alternative medicine bodywork training and people seeking to learn about complimentary health in-depth study for those entering the field of complementary health

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DNA from Cloned Animals

Friday, February 15th, 2008

(Ivanhoe Newswire)  Now that the FDA has declared meat and milk from cloned animals is safe to eat, a number of companies are producing cloned animals for the livestock industry.  Some are already marketing semen from clones.

A poll done by Consumers Union found that 89 percent of consumers want their food labeled to indicate whether it’s from cloned animals.   But should access to DNA from every unique clone be made public?  Patrick Cunningham of Dublin’s Trinity College and Chief Scientific Advisor to the Government of Ireland thinks so. 

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Predicting Protstate Cancer Recurrence

Friday, February 15th, 2008

(Ivanhoe Newswire) Currently, pathology reports and PSA levels are all that doctors have to predictor whether a man’s prostate cancer will spread or come back. New research done at the Oregon Health & Science University Cancer Institute has uncovered a biomarker that can significantly improve on what’s available.

Dr. Joshua Alumakal, MD conducted a study on men with localized prostate caner examining DNA and a gene modification process called methylation in which tumor suppressing genes like CDH13 are turned off. With the tumor-suppressing gene turned off, there is nothing to put the brakes on cell growth and spread. 

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Before you Smoke That ‘Cig’, Read This!

Friday, February 15th, 2008

(Ivanhoe Newswire) — Before you take your next cigarette puff, beware! If you are one of the majority of people with a common genetic defect, you are likely to suffer from an early heart attack.

“We’ve all heard the stories: Someone’s great-uncle has smoked three packs of cigarettes since he was 14, and now, at the age of 88, he’s living a fine, healthy life,” Arthur Moss, M.D., director of the Heart Research Follow-up Program at the University of Rochester Medical Center, was quoted as saying. Now, scientists say they have figured out why some smokers are luckier than others: they lack a defect of the gene CETP (cholesteryl ester transfer protein) found in 50 percent to 70 percent of the population.

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Health Food Alternative Medicine

Wednesday, February 6th, 2008

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Holistic Medecine. Worldwide Wellness ..be well naturally. Natural Medicine, Complementary Health Care & Alternative Therapies. Natural Medicine For The Health Crises ..with links

Traditional Medicine and Pseudoscience in China: A Report of the
Although the health of the masses did we met were physiotherapists, health food entrepreneurs, naturopaths, or other alternative in evaluating all putative therapies. We

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AstraZeneca withdraws Exanta

Friday, December 21st, 2007


AstraZeneca is to withdraw the anticoagulant Exanta (melagatran/ximelagatran) from the market and end its development. The venous thromboembolism (VTE) treatment has been withdrawn due to new data about the possibility of liver damage.

AstraZeneca chief executive David Brennan said: “We have decided to take this precautionary action in the interests of patient safety. “There are a number of alternative options for short-term post-operative anticoagulation following orthopaedic surgery. We would like to recognise the involvement of doctors, patients and scientists and their commitment to the development of Exanta over the past years.” He added: “Thrombosis is one of the greatest threats to human health and represents a significant public health burden. AstraZeneca remains committed to the discovery and development of new medicines in this area to help improve patients’ lives.”
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President Signs Prescription Drug Safety Bill

Friday, December 21st, 2007

President Bush today signed a comprehensive Food and Drug Administration bill that focuses on prescription drug safety reforms. The bill holds the prescription drug industry more accountable for the safety of their products by requiring them to publicly disclose drug safety studies, even the ones that show their medicines in an unflattering light. It also increases the budget for drug safety reviews at the Food and Drug Administration.

Statement by CALPIRG Advocate Emily Rusch:

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Experimental Nasal Spray May Reverse Sleep Deprivation

Friday, December 21st, 2007

(Ivanhoe Newswire) – College students, hospital interns, and others who are sleep-deprived may someday be able to get their condition reversed.

Scientists know that losing the hypothalamic neurons that produce orexin-A causes narcolepsy, and adding orexin-A produces arousal and increased attention. Orexin-A is a protein-like molecule the brain makes.

Now researchers have more evidence orexin-A can counteract the effects of sleep deprivation.

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Femara (letrozole) offers new hope for ovarian cancer patients

Friday, December 21st, 2007

Researchers at the University of Edinburgh have shown that hormone therapy can extend life in ovarian cancer patients, giving women a new alternative to chemotherapy.

The study, published today in Clinical Cancer Research, has proved for the first time that the targeted use of an anti-oestrogen drug could prolong the life of some patients by up to three years, and delay the use of chemotherapy in others.

Letrozole hormone therapy – already used with great success in the treatment of breast tumours - attacks cancer by turning off its oestrogen supply. But scientists now believe that in those ovarian cancers which are highly sensitive to oestrogen, this blocking mechanism could slow the growth and spread of disease.

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