Archive for the ‘Cancer Prevention’ Category

Insurer finds EMRs won’t pay off for its doctors

Monday, March 3rd, 2008

One health plan has come to a conclusion that many physicians already have reached: The financial benefits of office-based electronic medical records systems are not worth the cost to doctors.

Relying on information from past studies, including an American Medical Association estimate that doctors see only 11 cents of every dollar saved through the use of information technology, BlueCross BlueShield of Massachusetts recently announced that it has decided not to require physicians to install an EMR to participate in its bonus program.

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New effort enlists businesses to correct health care disparities

Monday, March 3rd, 2008

Washington — Offering health insurance is a first step employers can take to improve employees’ well-being. A second step increasingly is likely to be taken: ensuring that the health care employees receive adequately addresses the needs of an ever-more-diverse work force.

Striving to eliminate racial and ethnic disparities in health care is now recognized as a good business practice by some large employers, and a new coalition of business, medicine and public health groups has been formed to help advance this goal.

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Michigan patient safety study gets HHS approval to resume

Monday, March 3rd, 2008

A patient safety project that helped more than 100 Michigan hospital intensive care units cut their average catheter-related bloodstream infection rate by 66% can start collecting outcomes data again. That was the ruling last month from the Dept. of Health and Human Services’ Office for Human Research Protections.

The move was viewed widely as a reversal of OHRP’s controversial decision last fall to order the hospitals to suspend data collection. OHRP acted then because researchers had misclassified the project as being exempt from federal human research subject regulations and did not obtain informed consent from ICU patients.

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Health reform update: Transparency hot, state mandates not

Monday, March 3rd, 2008

Washington — Many states enacted modest health coverage expansions in 2007, but gloomy budget forecasts will continue to make it tough for them to adopt more expensive, comprehensive health reforms.

Three major state reform trends continued or developed in 2007, said Susan Laudicina, one of the authors of a recent BlueCross BlueShield Assn. report on health legislation. States continue to adopt bills expanding access to public health programs and legislation making private insurance more affordable or flexible. Ten states also adopted transparency bills, most of which required hospitals to disclose medical errors and infection rates.

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Treat Teens with Combo Therapy

Monday, March 3rd, 2008

(Ivanhoe Newswire) –Teenagers suffering from depression who do not respond well to their first antidepressant may have a viable treatment option.

Results of a large study conducted by the National Institute of Mental Health reveal teens who do not respond to a first antidepressant are more likely to respond to combination therapy — another antidepressant and psychotherapy.

Researchers observed 334 depressed teens who did not respond to treatment with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) — paroxetine (Paxil), citalopram (Celexa) or fluoxetine (Prozac) — alone for more than two months. They report 55 percent of teens who switched from their current medication to a different SSRI plus cognitive behavioral therapy responded to treatment.

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Jinx of the J-1 visa: IMGs finding other paths to residency

Monday, March 3rd, 2008

Glenns Ferry Health Center used to attract international medical graduates looking for work. But the Idaho clinic is now struggling to hire IMGs and finds itself part of a national crisis facing rural health centers.

The clinic has one full-time physician and two locum tenens who run the center’s three sites in the southern part of the state. Four doctors are needed, but two years of aggressive recruiting, including offering higher salaries, have generated no new hires, putting the clinic on the verge of closing one of its offices. That would leave patients, especially Medicaid mothers who rely on the center for prenatal and delivery services, few alternatives.

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Meningococcal bug develops quinolone resistance

Monday, March 3rd, 2008

In some areas of North Dakota and Minnesota, Neisseria meningitidis has developed resistance to quinolone antibiotics. Public health officials recommend that ciprofloxacin, the drug from this family commonly prescribed to reduce the risk of illness in healthy people who have been exposed to this bacterium, no longer be used for this purpose.

The officials also want physicians outside the region to be alert to the possibility that the medication may not have the desired effect, according to statements issued by health departments in those states and a report in the Feb. 22 (more…)

New Treatment for Heart Arrhythmias

Monday, March 3rd, 2008

PHILADELPHIA, Pa. (Ivanhoe Newswire) — One moment you feel fine. The next, your heart is racing at almost double the pace. Atrial fibrillation affects more than two million Americans. Although it is the most common arrhythmia, medicines for the condition only work about half the time. Now, researchers are testing a new tool that may help put a patient’s heart back on track.

 

Fifty-six year old Tom Calvaresi is the driving force behind his family winery. So when his heart started feeling funny, he didn’t ignore it.

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Rules aim for better patient safety through confidential error reports

Monday, March 3rd, 2008

Washington — Federal regulators have proposed sweeping patient safety rules to give physicians and others a confidential, voluntary way to report medical errors and near mistakes. Several health care organizations applauded the release of the long-awaited regulations but want a closer look before making a final judgment.

The rules, published Feb. 12 by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, would implement the Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Act of 2005. The law, supported by the American Medical Association, authorizes creating patient safety organizations to which doctors, other health professionals, hospitals and other institutions could report mistakes.

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Feelgood Health SOS HistaDrops: Natural Remedy for Hayfever, Sneezing (Natural Cures Allergies)

Sunday, February 17th, 2008

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How the Allergist/Immunologist Can Help: Consultation and Referral Guidelines Citing the Evidence. Allergic disease affects more than 50 million people in the United States, and is

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